Asian Dumplings | Williams-Sonoma

In honor of the upcoming Chinese New Year (February 19th) Williams-Sonoma has been doing Asian cooking classes this month. The first one was mainly focused on Asian Dumplings, something we’ve been interested in for quite awhile.

Before we get started, here are the 7 Asian Noodles we learned about in our class.

Dried-Soba-Noodles
Dried Soba Noodles | These are square cut Japanese buckwheat noodles. Depending on how much buckwheat flour is used, the colors of these noodles go from dark to light.

Fresh Soba Noodles are much harder to find than dried, but if you have the right equipment you can make them at home.

Fresh Rice Noodles | These noodles are sold in both precut and in sheets. You can get them in a variety of size from thin to flat.
Fresh Rice Noodles | These noodles are sold in both precut and in sheets. You can get them in a variety of size from thin to flat.

Dried Rice Noodles are often used for stir-fry dishes.

Cellophane Noodles | These noodles are also called bean thread, mung bean or glass noodles as they are made from mung beans. Once they've been cooked, these noodles turn clear.
Cellophane Noodles | These noodles are also called bean thread, mung bean or glass noodles as they are made from mung beans. Once they’ve been cooked, these noodles turn clear.
Chinese Egg Noodles | These noodles are available in both fresh and dried. They are a very versatile noodle and can be used in anything from stir-fry to deep-frying.
Chinese Egg Noodles | These noodles are available in both fresh and dried. They are a very versatile noodle and can be used in anything from stir-fry to deep-frying.
Udon Noodles | These noodles are Japanese in origin and are available both dried and fresh.
Udon Noodles | These noodles are Japanese in origin and are available both dried and fresh.

History on the dumpling…

Dumplings were first created during the winter. Their spicy fillings helped provide warmth from the bitter cold.

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For this class we went with the Pork and Cabbage Gyoza.

Our ingredients
Our ingredients

FullSizeRender

Some of our fellow 'classmates' tried their hands at filling and crimping the edges of the dumplings.
Some of our fellow ‘classmates’ tried their hands at filling and crimping the edges of the dumplings.

Ways to cook dumplings…

  1. Steam
  2. Boil then pan fry
  3. Pan fry

For this class we went with the second option.

Time to boil...
Time to boil…
Once the dumplings are done it's time to move onto the next step.
Once the dumplings are done it’s time to move onto the next step.
Pan fry until golden on either side.
Pan fry until golden on either side.
YUM
YUM!

Now for the recipe…

Pork and Cabbage Gyoza

For the filling…

  • 2 cups minced napa cabbage
  • 3/4 tsp. fine sea salt
  • 1/3 lb ground pork
  • 1 tbsp. peeled and minced fresh ginger
  • 1 small carrot, peeled and finely shredded
  • 9 green onions, including 1 inch of green tops, minced
  • 4 tsp. minced fresh cilantro
  • 2 large garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tbsp. tamari or soy sauce
  • 1/4 tsp. Asian sesame oil
  • 2 tsp. sesame seeds, lightly toasted
  • 2 tbsp. lightly beaten egg
  • Freshly ground pepper

Other ingredients…

  • 40 gyoza wrappers
  • 8 tbsp peanut oil for frying, or as needed
  • Choice of dipping sauces for serving.

Directions:

  1. To make the filling, place the cabbage in a colander in the sink and toss with 1/2 tsp of salt. Top with a flat plate and then with a heavy can or other weight and let drain for 30 minutes. Squeeze our as much water from the cabbage as possible.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, pork, ginger, green onions, cilantro, garlic, tamari, sesame oil, sesame seeds, egg, the remaining 1/4 tsp. salt and a few grinds of pepper. Using your hands, mix to distribute the ingredients evenly.
  3. Work with 10 gyoza wrappers at a time, and keep the others covered with a damp kitchen towel. Lay the wrappers in a single layer on a work surface. Place 1 tsp. of the filling in the center of each wrapper. Lightly brush the edge of the wrapper with water, and fold the wrapper in half to form a half moon. Holding the half moon in one hand, use the thumb and index finger of your other hand t make 4 or 5 pleats along the arc of the half-moon, pressing firmly to enclose the filling completely. Repeat to assemble the remaining gyoza.
  4. Preheat oven to 200F (95C.)
  5. In a large nonstick fry pan over high heat, warm 3 tbsp. of the peanut oil. When the oil is hot, add as many dumplings as will fit in a single layer without crowding and sear until browned underneath, about 4 minutes. Using a metal spatula, carefully flip the dumplings over and fry until browned on the other side, about 2 minutes more. Reduce the heat to low, add 4-5 tbsp water, cover lightly, and steam until the filling is cooked through and the water has evaporated, about 5 minutes. Using the spatula, transfer the dumplings to a heatproof platter and keep warm in the oven. Repeat to cook the remaining dumplings.
  6. Serve the gyoza hot. Pass dipping sauces at the table or serve in individual dipping bowls. Serves 4 to 8.

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We picked up this handily little tool to help us make our own dumplings at home as well some of the Ginger Soy Dipping Sauce and Chow Mien Noodle Sauce.

Next we made a little stir fry dish with zucchini noodles, udon noodle, veal and veggies.

We used this handy little tool to create the zucchini noodles.
We used this handy little tool to create the zucchini noodles.
First we cook the veal.
First we cook the veal.
Time to cook the zucchini noodles.
Time to cook the zucchini noodles.
Time to add the cooked noodles.
Time to add the cooked noodles.
Stir it all together.
Stir it all together.
All done.
All done.

I don’t do veal, so we didn’t taste this one, but it did look yummy.

Now for some of the the Asian goodies Williams-Sonoma has in store.

Stay tuned for the Stir-fry class we took last weekend.

~thefoodie

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2 thoughts on “Asian Dumplings | Williams-Sonoma

  1. Looks like a fun day. Have you tried using that press to make them at home yet? I’ve made zucchini noodles with a tool I have at home and they are yummy just simply pan fried in butter.

    1. There is a online Dumpling Class on Craftsy we’re signed up for and we plan to try it out then. Not sure if we’ll start the class this weekend or next but I’ll post about it and let you know how our new tool works. Getting a gadget to make zucchini noodles is next on my list. 😀

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